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Ambien side effects

What are the possible side effects of Ambien?

The most common side effects of Ambien are:

  • Drowsiness. It is related to not getting enough sleep, it refers to feeling sleepy or tired, or being unable to keep your eyes open. When drowsiness occurs can be affected your quality of life and performance.

  • Dizziness. It is the feeling of being lightheaded, woozy, or unbalanced. Dizziness affects the sensory organs, specifically ears and eyes. It can cause fainting. It is not a disease but a possible side effect of Ambien.

  • Diarrhea. It is a condition that’s characterized by the appearance of loose, watery stools or a frequent need to have a bowel movement.

  • A "drugged" feeling, which probably reflect the action of the drug.

Ambien may cause a severe allergic reaction. Stop taking Ambien and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives, difficulty breathing, swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Also, Ambien may cause withdrawal symptoms when the drug is abruptly discontinued. Ambien can cause abnormal behavior with confusion, paradoxical insomnia or "complex sleep-related behaviors," which may include sleep-driving. If these side effects appear, stop taking Ambien immediately.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: depression, anxiety, aggression, agitation, confusion, unusual thoughts, hallucinations, memory problems, changes in personality, risk-taking behavior, decreased inhibitions, no fear of danger, or thoughts of suicide or hurting...

Less common side effects may include:

Mental and physical dependence can occur. Keep Ambien in a safe place to prevent misuse and abuse. Selling or giving away Ambien can harm others, and is against the law.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION RELATED TO AMBIEN:

GENERIC AMBIEN NEWS:

Tuesday, March. 15, 2016 | Can This Medication be a stroke treatment?

Some scientists made a new study and they found that low doses of Zolpidem which is known under the brand name Ambien can help with stroke recovery. The researchers made the study using an animal model. They helped mice rebound from strokes much faster than those that did not receive a dose of Zolpidem. Strokes cause initial damage when part of the brain's blood supply is blocked and this damage occurs within the first few hours. Although drugs and mechanical devices for clearing this blockage are available, they must be initiated within a short period of time after the onset of the stroke, making them beneficial to less than 10 percent of stroke patients.

In the current study, scientists administered low doses of zolpidem, which enhances synaptic signaling of the Gaba receptor — the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain — three days after the stroke in order to guarantee that any effects they observed where from the drug's effects on brain recovery. In the first group of mice, they induced strokes that damaged sensory ability, and in the other group of mice, they induced strokes that impair movement. In each group of mice was administered a regimen of zolpidem or a control solution without the drug.

The results of this study realized by scientists at the Stanford University Medical Center, showed that mice treated with zolpidem were recovered from their stroke-induced impairment at a significantly faster rate than the control mice. Mice untreated with zolpidem took approximately one month to recover from their impairment, while mice treated with zolpidem took only a few days.

Because of these results, scientists open up new possibilities for stroke treatment and will push researchers to further investigate the role of GABA in stroke recovery.